Why Invest Forever? (Part 6)

Key Points

  • Assuming a 7.2% annualized real return (including reinvested dividends), an investment will double in value about every 10 years following the rule of 72.
  • Given this rate of return, $1 can grow to $1000 after 100 years and $1 million after 200 years.
  • After enough gains in capital, incremental income can be consumed on a go-forward basis (practically indefinitely), without eroding the capital base (note: restrictions apply).

Continue reading “Why Invest Forever? (Part 6)”

Why Invest Forever? (Part 4)

Key Points

  • Although the worst-case outcomes for the investing in the S&P 500® Index seem uninviting, the index has provided reasonable returns the vast majority of the time.
  • The worst-case 5-year holding period for the index produced an annualized real return of -13.233%; however, over 80% of the time the 5-year holding period produced a positive real (inflation-adjusted) return.
  • Further, the worst-case 45-year holding period for the index produced an annualized real return of only about 3.5%; however, 90% of the time the 45-year holding period produced a solid annualized real return of close to 5% or better.

Continue reading “Why Invest Forever? (Part 4)”

Why Invest Forever? (Part 3)

Key Points

  • Since 1973 the S&P 500® Index has posted considerable gains—over this period the index has averaged over 10% per year in gains after reinvesting dividends, before taxes and fees.
  • However, investigating other 45-year periods (going as far back as 1871) leads to a more useful picture of the index’s performance across differing economic environments.
  • According to history, it’s better to invest in the index over longer periods in order to increase the likelihood of providing favorable returns and decrease the likelihood of losing money.

Continue reading “Why Invest Forever? (Part 3)”